Contact:

Office of Communications (pr@colby.edu)
207-859-4350

Colby College is pleased to announce its October events. All are free (except where noted) and open to the public.

Tuesday, October 3, 7 p.m.
Environmental Studies Evening Colloquium

Energy for Maine’s Future with Sherry Huber of the MaineWatch Institute
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Contact: Beth Kopp, 859-4846, Beth.Kopp@colby.edu

Tuesday, October 3, 7 p.m.
Achieving a Common Mission, Facing New Challenges: The U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
Robins Room, Roberts Union
Contact: Kate O’Halloran, 859-5319, kohallor@colby.edu

Thursday, October 5, 7 p.m.
Goldfarb Center Event
The Global War on Terror: Who is the Enemy? with military sociologist Ian Roxborough
Room 100, Lovejoy Building
Roxborough will examine how our understanding and prosecution of the war on terrorism depends on how we define the enemy. He will discuss several alternative definitions of the enemy and describe the consequences of each definition for our military and foreign policies.
Contact: Kate O’Halloran, 859-5319, kohallor@colby.edu

Thursday, October 5, 7:30 p.m.
Kate Clinton Performance (Sold Out)
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center
Standup comedian Kate Clinton aims to use humor as a tool for progressive social and cultural change. She calls herself “a faith-based, tax-paying, America-loving political humorist and family entertainer.” This national tour marks her 25th anniversary on the stage.
Contact: Professor Elizabeth Leonard, 859-5322, edleonar@colby.edu

Friday, October 6, 4 p.m.     
Revolution and Counter-Revolution on the Northern Borderland, 1775-1815
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Building
Pulitzer Prize winner Alan S. Taylor ’77 specializes in early American history, history of the American West, and the history of pre-Confederation Canada. Among his many books William Cooper’s Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early American Republic won a Pulitzer Prize in 1996. Taylor is currently working on what he calls “a borderlands history of Canada and the United States in the aftermath of the American Revolution.”
Contact: Professor Elizabeth Leonard, 859-5322, edleonar@colby.edu

Friday, October 6, 7 p.m.
Hogendorn Lecture
Does Restructuring the Electricity Industry Have Environmental Consequences? with Erin Mansur ’95, Yale economics and environmental science professor
Room 1, F. W. Olin Science Center
Contact: Dianne Labreck, 859-5230, dlabreck@colby.edu

Friday, October 6, 7:30 p.m.
Cyrano de Bergerac
Strider Theater, Runnals Building
First produced in 1897, Cyrano de Bergerac is considered the most popular modern French play. Cyrano, a hot-tempered swordsman with an inordinately long nose, is hopelessly enamored of the beautiful Roxane. She, in turn, is in love with a handsome but inarticulate soldier named Christian. Asked for help by Christian in wooing Roxane, Cyrano pours out his heart through ardent love letters written in the name of Christian. A witty and elegant romantic comedy written by Edmond Rostand and presented by Blackfriars Stage Company (Formerly Shenandoah Shakespeare).
Tickets: $2 with Colby I.D. and for seniors; $3 general admission. Box office is open Monday through Saturday during the week of the performance from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Contact: Deborah Ward, 859-4520, djward@colby.edu

Saturday, October 7, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.     
Colby Craft Fair
The show features more than 90 exhibits including jewelry, woodworking, furniture, toys and dolls, dried flowers, wreaths, wrought iron, leather, glass work, weaving, baskets, and pottery.
Field House, Harold Alfond Athletic Center
Contact: Deborah Thurston, 877-9444, dbthurst@colby.edu

Saturday, October 7, 11 a.m.     
Woodsmen’s Team Demonstration
Woodsmen’s area, Washington Street (past Johnson Pond, across the street from Hillside parking lot)
Contact: Karin Weston, 859-4315, krweston@colby.edu

Saturday, October 7, 11:45 a.m.
Earl Smith on Mayflower Hill
Room 105, Keyes Building
Waterville native Earl Smith, Colby’s historian and former dean of the college, will speak and answer questions about his just-published book, Mayflower Hill. The book intertwines the history of the college with the history of Waterville and of social movements that have affected higher education for the past 200 years.
Contact: Karin Weston, 859-4315, krweston@colby.edu

Saturday, October 7, 2 p.m.     
Tour of the Colby College Museum of Art with Carolyn Muzzy Director and Chief Curator Sharon Corwin
Lobby, Colby College Museum of Art
Contact: Colby College Museum of Art, 207-859-5600, museum@colby.edu

Saturday, October 7, 6 p.m.     
Jazz Performance conducted by Eric Thomas, director of band activities
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Saturday, October 7, 7:30 p.m.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Strider Theater, Runnals Building
A Midsummer Night’s Dream‘s theatrical spell is powerful enough to make audiences believe in anything. Fairies bicker over an orphan boy, lovers lost in the woods succumb to magical potions, legendary Greek heroes dispute issues of art, tradesmen rehearse a play in the woods, and the queen of the fairies falls in love with an ass-headed man. This is Shakespeare’s hilarious tribute to the imagination. Presented by Blackfriars Stage Company (Formerly Shenandoah Shakespeare).
Tickets: $2 with Colby I.D. and for seniors; $3 general admission. Box office is open Monday through Saturday during the week of the performance from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Contact: Deborah Ward, 859-4520, djward@colby.edu

October 12, 7:30 p.m.
Mitchell Distinguished International Lecture Series

Former President of Ireland Mary Robinson
Lorimer Chapel
Mary Robinson is a former president of Ireland (1990-1997), and former United Nations High Commissioner of Human Rights (1997-2002). In this role she gave priority to integrating human rights concerns in all the activities of the U.N. Her office focused its work at the country and regional levels. During her first year as High Commissioner she traveled to Rwanda, South Africa, Colombia and Cambodia, among other countries. In 1998, she was the first High Commissioner to visit China. Robinson sent human rights workers to Indonesia and to countries in Europe and Africa, and she strengthened human rights monitoring in areas of conflict such as Kosovo.
Contact: Kate O’Halloran, 859-5319, kohallor@colby.edu

Wednesday, October 18, 7 p.m.
Artist’s Talk: Amy Stacey Curtis
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Amy Stacey Curtis is the Maine Arts Commission’s 2005 Individual Artist for Visual Art. Her solo exhibitions are installed in vast spaces throughout Maine. From October 7-27, this installation, Sound, is in place at in Waterville’s Central Maine Power building on Water Street.
Contact: Colby College Museum of Art, 859-5600, museum@colby.edu

Thursday, October 19, 4 p.m.
Poetry Reading and Reception: Wes McNair
Robinson Room, Miller Library
Maine poet Wes McNair will read from his latest collection, The Ghosts of You & Me.
Contact: Pat Burdick, Special Collections Librarian, 859-5151

Thursday, October 19, 7 p.m.
Goldfarb Center Event

Changing Approaches to U.S. Foreign Assistance in Latin America
Room 100, Lovejoy Building
Patrick Duddy ’72, deputy assistant secretary of state for foreign assistance, western hemisphere, will speak about U.S. policy toward Latin America, including foreign assistance policy, under the Bush Administration.
Contact: Kate O’Halloran, 859-5319, kohallor@colby.edu

Sunday, October 22, 7 p.m.
Goldfarb Center Event

U.S. Senatorial Debate
Page Commons, Cotter Union
Republican Senator Olympia Snowe will square off against her Democratic opponent, Jean Hay Bright. David Offer, executive editor of the Morning Sentinel, will moderate. The debate will last one hour, and Offer will select questions from the audience.
Contact: Alice Elliott, 859-5313, aelliott@colby.edu

Monday, October 23, 7 p.m.
Access to Water as a Human Rights Issue
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Contact: Kate O’Halloran, 859-5319, kohallor@colby.edu

Tuesday, October 24, 7 p.m.
Environmental Studies Evening Colloquium

Inspiring Progress: Religions’ Contributions to Sustainable Development
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Gary Gardner of the WorldWatch Institute advocates for a new type of progress — one that requires economies and societies to be rooted in the natural environment — and that the goals of progress be revamped to stress well-being rather than wealth creation. Gardner will critically examine the progress of the 20th century and show how businesses, policymakers, and civil society, including religious groups, are working to forge a new vision of progress.
Contact: Beth Kopp, 859-4846, Beth.Kopp@colby.edu

Tuesday, October 24, 7:30 p.m.
James M. Carpenter Lecture

The Art of Isabella Stewart Gardner
Room 105, Keyes Building
This lecture will examine the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Linda Docherty, a professor of art at Bowdoin, will show how literary and visual sources informed Gardner’s public presentation of her art collections and how Gardner’s museum idea evolved in relation to a private spiritual journey.
Contact: Vicki Hendsbee, 859-5631, vlhendsb@colby.edu

Wednesday, October 25, 5:30 p.m.
Earl Smith on Mayflower Hill
Special Collections, Miller Library
Waterville native Earl Smith, Colby’s historian and former dean of the college, will be speak and answer questions about his just-published book, Mayflower Hill. The book intertwines the history of the college with the history of Waterville and of social movements that have affected higher education for the past 200 years. Please RSVP.
Contact: Colby College Alumni Relations, 859-4310, alumni@colby.edu

Wednesday, October 25, 7:30 p.m.
Waterville Documentary Night

A Burst the Bubble Week Event
Room 1, Olin Science Center
A few short student-produced documentaries that highlight meanings of community in Waterville will be screened.  
Contact: Megan Bovill ’07, mrbovill@colby.edu

Thursday, October 26, 7:30 p.m.
Burst the Bubble Week Keynote Address: Community and Identity
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Waterville native and winner of the Maine Writers’ and Publishers’ Chapbook Award for
Creative Nonfiction, Rhea Cote Robbins, will speak about how growing up in the South End of Waterville shaped her identity.
Contact: Megan Bovill ’07, mrbovill@colby.edu

Thursday – Saturday, October 26-28, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, October 28, 2 p.m.
Rosencrantz
A Powder & Wig Production
Cellar Theater, Runnals
Tickets: $2 with Colby I.D. and for seniors; $3 general admission.
Contact: Deb Ward, 859-4520, djward@colby.edu

Saturday, October 28, 7:30 p.m.
Music at Colby

Colby Symphony Orchestra
Lorimer Chapel
The first symphony concert in this year’s series will feature an eclectic sampling of returning conductor Jonathan Hallstrom’s favorite works. Included will be Tschaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet Overture-Fantasy, Bartok’s Rumanian Folk Dances, and Beethoven’s “Emperor” piano concerto with Colby faculty pianist Cheryl Tschanz.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Tuesday, October 31, 7 p.m.
Boylan and Bassett Annual Halloween Reading
Lorimer Chapel
Contact: Department of English, 859-5251
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Ongoing Exhibitions at the Colby College Museum of Art
July 22 – October 29
The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture: 60 Years
In its 60-year history, the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture has established itself as one of the most important art schools in the country. Run by artists for artists, Skowhegan has been bringing students and faculty together since 1946 for nine-week summer sessions. This exhibition includes works by 27 Skowhegan faculty members and provides a unique opportunity to consider the impact of Skowhegan on the visual arts in America. The exhibition will link the works of art with excerpts from lectures by each artist through digital recordings from the newly formed Skowhegan Lecture Archive, which consists of more than 560 lectures recorded at the school. By bringing artists’ voices into the museum, the exhibition emphasizes listening as well as looking, and it bridges artistic ideas and the works themselves.

June 25, 2006 – February 25, 2007
Whistler as Printmaker
While James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903) achieved fame as a painter, he was also a serious and innovative printmaker, producing some 450 etchings and about 180 lithographs. His imagery and the technical means that he developed for etching and for printing plates influenced not only his fellow printmakers in Europe and America but also many others who followed. This selection of prints is drawn from a collection on loan to the Colby museum consisting of almost 200 impressions representing the highest quality and range of Whistler’s printmaking. Curated by David P. Becker

The Colby College Museum of Art is open 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4:30 p.m. Sunday. It is closed on Mondays. Admission is free and the museum is accessible to people with disabilities. For more information call 207-859-5600 or visit http://www.colby.edu/museum/.