The 9th Annual Global Images Photo Contest for the 2016-2017 Academic Year has begun!  Please follow the rules and guidelines to submit your photos!!  

 

With more than 200 off-campus-study options in more than 60 countries, two-thirds of Colby students study abroad, immersing themselves in the diverse languages and cultures of the world.

Each year the Office of Off-Campus Study runs the Global Images Photo Contest. Students are encouraged to take and submit photos that capture the people and places that contributed to their transformative experience abroad. First-, second-, and third-place students’ photos (left to right) are featured below in four categories. To view all the photos entered into the contest, go to the Off-Campus Study Facebook page.

 

Photo Contest 2016: winning photos from students abroad in 2015-16

Landscapes & Streetscapes

A landscape or streetscape that reveals or symbolizes your vision of the place you visited and provides a sense of the place in which it was taken. What about this image makes it meaningful for you?

A Window in Granada
A Window in Granada

A Window in Granada

This is a photo I took inside the Alhambra looking out over the city of Granada. Some of my most memorable experiences in Spain were weekend trips sponsored by our program. One of these trips was to the neighboring city of Granada, where a group of about 30 students and I were given a tour of the Alhambra by two of our professors. There’s a reason it is the most visited tourist destination in Spain – the views and architecture throughout the Alhambra are stunning, and the history of the palace and surrounding buildings is fascinating. This is one of many architecturally impressive rooms in the Alhambra, with a spectacular view of the town and mountains that surround it. (Sevilla, Spain) submitted by Ben Bostwick '17

Africa’s Greatest Vanishing Act
Africa’s Greatest Vanishing Act

Africa’s Greatest Vanishing Act

While I was in Botswana, I was captivated by the dramatic landscapes and the amazing wildlife. I was so fortunate to get to experience everything I did, but I did not truly understand how fortunate I was. Every morning I would wake up and see lion, leopard, or wild dog prints outside of my tent. Every morning I would watch as the sun rose over the tree line, listening to the sounds of elephants playing, or wild dogs hunting. The Okavango Delta is one of Africa’s, if not the world’s, most intact wilderness areas. Wildlife thrives there, and poaching and resource extraction is very minimal. This does not tell the full story, however. Africa as a whole, is dying. Landscapes are changing drastically, and wildlife populations are being decimated. Elephants are the most visible example of this, with current populations (~415,000) being a tenth of what they were estimated to be in the early 20th century. This photo embodies my experience of Africa, both captivating and untamed, but not truthful. I was blinded by all the wildlife I saw and interacted with, but this photo was a subtle reminder of that truth. (Mababe, Botswana) submitted by Fen Bowen '17

On Foot
On Foot

On Foot

I started to marvel at how the invention of the wheel has revolutionized human destiny since my first time to the States. At the same time, I can't help wondering how far we are still travelling on foot and how much we are still learning from such a laborious experience. Studying abroad in the U.K. allowed me to walk (almost!) anywhere and everywhere. This sunrise was captured on the Isle of Wight, southern England. Unlike the driver who might be grumbling over the piercing sunlight and mindful of various things that could suddenly cross the street, I was mulling over what awaited behind the sun. Would it be another curvature, a valley, or a sea view? What is more likely since I am in the middle of the island? On my foot, I stopped once in while, turning around to examine the architecture, hence the personality, of houses that, by a glance, looked almost the same. Instead of taking a given ride, I chose my own footpath to explore, to venture and ruminate. Isn't it all about youth? (Isle of Wight, England) submitted by Phuong Le '17

 

Portraits

A portrait of a person or group of people you encountered abroad. How did this encounter occur or what was your relationship with this person(s)? How does this portrait capture or illustrate, for you, the way of life or cultural context of the people among whom you lived during your studies abroad? What does it tell you about the people of this country?

Caras de la Crisis
Caras de la Crisis

Caras de la Crisis

One of the most valuable classes I took abroad happened to be one I added on a whim at the last minute – a photography class. The course revolved around a semester long project of our choosing. With the conscious objective to explore the city and improve my language skills, I decided to photograph the city’s homeless population and conduct follow-up interviews with each of them. Each of these interviews was challenging, and this one with Mari was no different. Living with a disability, she has struggled to find work in a country whose youth unemployment has hovered around 45%. Yet one of her biggest struggles, she said, was watching so many people pass her each day and feeling as though no one cared about her or her situation. I took this picture before our discussion and was struck by how her sentiments shown through in the picture. (Sevilla, Spain) Submitted by Ben Bostwick '17

Sunday Afternoon
Sunday Afternoon

Sunday Afternoon

Art is an important component for London and its people. I encountered this young, hippie, and broke couple enjoying Mona Hatoum’s exhibition at Tate Modern, London. The exhibition ticket was not cheap but they were probably the happiest couple in the world this Sunday afternoon. (London, England) Submitted by Yichen Lu '17

Mother and Daughter
Mother and Daughter

Mother and Daughter

Beyond the beautiful sunsets, hiking trails, and delectable food found in Cinque Terre, the moments that stood out to me most from my visit to the Italian coast involved witnessing the ways that the Italians detached themselves from the many crowds of tourists on the narrow streets and sought ways to enjoy one another’s company. I found this mother-child interaction to be especially moving – although the basketball net was not even upright, the mother and daughter made do with passing the ball back-and-forth again and again, smiling and cheering each other on with each catch. (Manarola, Cinque Terre, Italy) Submitted by Cara Goldfarb '17

 

The Global Classroom

Select a photo which represents an academic aspect of your off-campus study experience, indicating the name and type of program on which you studied. The photo should:

  • Show a learning experience you had either in the classroom, during a course-related excursion, a cultural event/activity, or while engaging with local culture
  • Illustrate the process of learning (and how it may or may not be different than learning at Colby), or
  • Depicts a product, outcome or achievement which is a result of your academic experience
Glacier Ice in Patagonia
Glacier Ice in Patagonia

Glacier Ice in Patagonia

While backpacking through Torres del Paine, the famed national park of the Chilean Patagonia, local employees of the park taught us all about glaciers, including how the beautiful blue color of the ice is caused by the slow removal of oxygen during the melting and refreezing of ice blocks. They also gave me my first real world lesson of climate change, describing how the Patagonian glaciers (including the one in the picture) are receding by over a hundred feet every year. Its amazing what you can learn from strangers. (Patagonia, Chile) submitted by Craig Ballard '17

A Reminder of Their Old Existence
A Reminder of Their Old Existence

A Reminder of Their Old Existence

At Colby, we learn a lot of theory, but we rarely have the opportunity to see how such theories play out in the world. The best part about studying abroad with SIT’s IHP: Cities in the 21st Century: People, Planning, and Politics program was having the opportunity to learn about the the problems in a city from the perspective of the people being affected by an issue instead of from the perspective of an academic. This image was from my time in Ahmedabad, India in a neighborhood by the name of Charmaliya, which means four stories in English. Charmaliya, the grey apartments featured in the photo, is one of the government’s housing complexes where displaced slum communities were relocated to during the construction of the Sabarmati riverfront redevelopment project. This photograph was taken during the our Neighborhood Day, which is a small group assignment where we visit a neighborhood in the city to learn about the people who live there, the history of the neighborhood, and some of problems that the neighborhood is currently facing. For me, this photo represents the effects of displacing people. The displaced residents in Charmaliya have to look over into the neighboring community and have a constant reminder of their old home. In every interview that we had with a  community member, someone mentioned, “we don’t know how to live in vertical houses” or “ this housing is worse than our old houses.” An architect, an expert in his/her field, designed this housing, yet, they could not foresee the unintended consequences that may come with the design. At this moment, I realized that I never want to lose sight of the human element in my work, whatever that may be, for the sake of progress and validating my expertise.  (Ahmedabad, India) submitted by Ant-quanique Dancy '17

Learning To Go Aloft
Learning To Go Aloft

Learning To Go Aloft

This photo depicts students of SEA Semester class S-263 learning to go aloft. Going aloft is an important aspect of sailing, it is required to set and strike sails, and to ensure proper maintenance of the rigging. While sailing aboard the SSV Robert C. Seamans, I had the unique opportunity to learn many new things and to gain many new experiences. A large part of our education over the course of this program was learning how to sail a tall ship as well as many maritime traditions. I found this experience to be both challenging and rewarding. I was able to progress from simply observing the sailing to leading my own watch. This was truly a once in a lifetime experience and I grew greatly from the education that I received.  (South Pacific Ocean) submitted by Hayley Kushner '17

 

The Student Experience

Look at the photos you took. Looking beyond the beautiful views or funny shots to select an image that illustrates or documents a personal or professional skill you developed while you were out seeing the world. What does your photo actually say about you and the skills you used or gained during your time away? Explain “what you see” in the photo at first glance (what the picture is about) versus “what you get” (what lesson(s) or skills your derived from the activity or experience.

The Sailboat//Sejlåden
The Sailboat//Sejlåden

The Sailboat//Sejlåden

One of the last activities I participated in consisted of sailing with my host mom, Bolette, and her friends from the Danish Marine Coast Guard. Now this was one of the few times I had been on a boat, so no sailing skills were gained in this excursion, but this was an experience that culminated my bonding with Bolette as well as my involvement in Danish culture. Originally, I was supposed to be on the same boat as Bolette, but because of a conflict, I ended up on a sailboat with two of her friends while she was on the boat that is in the picture. Throughout my time abroad I learned to be adaptable in situations that may make me uncomfortable, like being on a boat with two strangers or not being able to communicate with others. Learning to be flexible in life can open you so many amazing experiences that you might not have engaged in otherwise. Thankfully I was able to enjoy my host mom’s love of sailing, and I even got to steer the boat through the harbor! After our sailing excursion, we ended the night with “hygge” - good food, company, and conversation - a Danish farewell from my host mom. (Greve Strand, Denmark) submitted by Danielle Bagley '17

La Chiva
La Chiva

La Chiva

A chiva is a type of open air bus commonly found in Ecuador. They are known as party buses because Ecuadorians often rent them to sing, dance, and drink with friends and family while riding around the town, usually to commemorate a special event like a birthday. I took two chiva rides while studying abroad -- one during my first week in Ecuador and again during my last week in the country. These different chiva rides remind me of my growth as an independent traveler while studying abroad. When I first arrived in the country, I easily felt embarrassed when I tripped up on a Spanish word or had a cultural misunderstanding with my host family. By the end of my time abroad, I became more comfortable expressing myself and interacting with Ecuadorians on a daily basis. The fact that my chiva rides happened at the very beginning and ending of my abroad program reminds me of how far I had come in my learning experience. I took a picture of this particular chiva while touring the popular town of Baños de Aguas Santas with a fellow Colby student. We saw the chiva pass through a waterfall and then drive through the mountains. It is said that many years ago the Virgin Mary appeared near a waterfall in this town; after this, Baños became an important Catholic site in Ecuador. This photo is a memory of not only my trip to Baños, but a culmination of my personal journey while studying abroad. (Baños, Ecuador) submitted by Jasmyn Davis '17

The Other Side of the Trees
The Other Side of the Trees

The Other Side of the Trees

Just on the other side of these trees is the Champ de Mars, the grassy park at the foot of their Eiffel Tower and one of the busiest and highly congested tourist areas in Paris. This side of the trees however, is almost exclusively visited by locals running and walking their dogs. During my stay I got in the habit of running in this area in the mornings. For me this photo embodies my experience of transitioning from an outsider to someone truly integrated into my host city. This image represents a moment where I felt completely at home and the independence I gained living in this incredible, beautiful, international city. It also helps that, aside from the Eiffel Tower peeking out of the trees, this scene could easily be in Maine. (Paris, France) submitted by Cate Johnson '17

 

 

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Photo Contest 2015: winning photos from students abroad in 2014-15

The Student Experience

Look at the photos you took. Looking beyond the beautiful views or funny shots to select an image that illustrates or documents a personal or professional skill you developed while you were out seeing the world. Based on the examples in the article 5 Resume Boosters Hidden In Your Study Abroad Photos, what does your photo actually say about you and the skills you used or gained during your time away? Explain “what you see” in the photo at first glance (what the picture is about) versus “what you get” (what lesson(s) or skills your derived from the activity or experience.

Delicious
Delicious

Delicious

It might be hard to guess how this photo represents skills I acquired while abroad. I'll be the first to admit it - I didn't even make the salad. But I took this picture in my last days of traveling in Europe, after nine months studying in Aix-en-Provence, France. I took it on a two-week trip that I planned from start to finish. I took it after teaching myself enough Greek to order the salad. I took it after a night spent talking with locals, in three different languages, about the differences between their lives and my own. I took it when I was happy and hungry and proud of how far I'd come. I didn't realize how afraid I was - of so many things - before I went abroad. The thought of spending time with total strangers terrified me. I'd never even flown on a plane by myself, and I worried about every little detail. No magical transformation took place...I didn't go over and make ten new best friends and live every day like I was on vacation. Growth is as painful as it is beautiful. What they don't tell you about abroad is how hard the struggle can be. However, the person who came back from France is someone I like and understand much better than the person who left last fall. I can't put into words all of the changes I have undergone, but for me, this picture encapsulates what I gained in a year of coming to know myself. I earned this moment on a beach with a simple salad - and it was delicious. (Agia Marina, Aegina, Greece) Submitted by Kaitlin Curran '16

Above and Beyond
Above and Beyond

Above and Beyond

This photograph, taken from the top of the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, exemplifies the unadorned beauty of the city that truly secured my heart while studying abroad. Before heading to Italy, my mom gave me an important piece of advice: look up. Look up from your phone, from your feet, from your conventional habits. I spent my entire four months in Florence doing just that: admiring, and photographing, life through a unique lens. But, there were moments, ironically, that looking down opened my eyes to an entirely new perspective. I was living in one of the most breathtaking cities in the world. Above it. Glancing down at timeworn terra-cotta and cobblestone. Placed atop history. I realized, in this moment, the treasure and value of simply “looking.” (Florence, Italy) Submitted by Kelly McCarthy '16

Little tourists, big Perito Moreno
Little tourists, big Perito Moreno

Little tourists, big Perito Moreno

One of the popular tourist attractions in Argentina is the Glaciar Perito Moreno, one of the largest glaciers in Los Glaciares National Park in Argentinian Patagonia. Tourists arrive at the glacier by boat and line up to tie on their crampons and walk on the glacier. Echoes of ice breaking off the structure ripple across the glacier’s surface, reminding you that it too is not eternal. Based on the second example of the article “5 Resume Boosters Hidden in Your Study Abroad Photos”, I believe that this photograph shows a humbleness that comes with being surrounded by something with a longer story than you. At first you see tourists lining up to live the unique experience of a glacier thousands of years old, but really what you are seeing are the remains of an ice cap that is struggling to survive through the warming of our planet. (Patagonia, Argentina) Submitted by Lidia Henderson '16

 

The Global Classroom

Select a photo which represents an academic aspect of your off-campus study experience, indicating the name and type of program on which you studied. The photo should:

  • Show a learning experience you had either in the classroom, during a course-related excursion, a cultural event/activity, or while engaging with local culture
  • Illustrate the process of learning (and how it may or may not be different than learning at Colby), or
  • Depicts a product, outcome or achievement which is a result of your academic experience
Reflections of a Changing Climate
Reflections of a Changing Climate

Reflections of a Changing Climate

During my studies at James Cook University I had the opportunity to do fieldwork on the remote and tropical Orpheus Island, located on the Great Barrier Reef in Northern Queensland. My professors were among the world’s top coral biologists and focused on the effects of climate change and ocean acidification on Great Barrier Reef corals. Displayed is a photo of coral biologist Bette Willis reflected in a pool of Orpheus Island Corals. (Orpheus Island, Northern Queensland- Australia) Submitted by Mary Parks '16

At Home in the Ancient World
At Home in the Ancient World

At Home in the Ancient World

One of my favorite things about College Year in Athens was that so much of our time was spent learning on-site. Not only did one of my classes learn about the archaeological sites of Athens from inside (including inside the Parthenon, closed to the public) and one met in the archaeological museum for half of its class meetings, but our field trips were organized so that some classes held meetings in sites around Greece that we had discussed previously in class. These sites included Knossos (a major Minoan site), Delphi (a famous sanctuary), and Epidauros, pictured here. Its theater is the best preserved and one of the largest dating back to Ancient Greece, and my Myth and Religion class had spent a lot of time talking about the festivals and rituals that used to happen there and comparing them to those of other sites in Greece. To be able to actually stand at the top and look down on the stage and surrounding countryside made what we had discussed in class feel so much more real, like I could have actually taken part in the ancient celebrations. (Epidauros, Greece) Submitted by Maggie Chutter '16

Through the Grapevine
Through the Grapevine

Through the Grapevine

This photo was taken at the Château de Villandry in the Loire Valley, France. Incredible gardens and grapevine-covered archways, like this one, surround this beautiful castle. All of the First Semester Abroad students in Dijon travelled here with our professor to explore this region’s detailed history firsthand. Wandering through this castle’s grounds and later touring Leonardo Da Vinci's country home provided an educational experience we couldn’t have had inside the four walls of a classroom, no matter what country.  (Loire Valley, France) Submitted by Clare Stephens '18

 

Portraits

A portrait of a person or group of people you encountered abroad. How did this encounter occur or what was your relationship with this person(s)? How does this portrait capture or illustrate, for you, the way of life or cultural context of the people among whom you lived during your studies abroad? What does it tell you about the people of this country?

Reflections
Reflections

Reflections

My brother and I stumbled upon this deserted boathouse about 2 miles into our hike in Berchtesgaden National Park. This location was not easily accessible, requiring a one-hour boat ride that began at the entrance of the park and ventured across the Königssee. The man in this photo was likely well into his 70’s and stood in this spot for a few minutes before continuing on. I have often wondered what brought him to this very serene and remote part of the park, and how difficult it must have been for him to reach it. The thoughts that ran through his mind as he peered out across the Obersee still remain a mystery to me, and I feel extremely lucky that I was able to not only witness this moment, but capture it as well. (Berchtesgaden National Park, Germany) Submitted by Olivia Pearson '16

Familia y Feria
Familia y Feria

Familia y Feria

While abroad I lived in a three-apartment home with twelve family members. Although this could be hectic, I was welcomed in with open arms not only making me feel at home but making me feel truly Spanish. My family taught me Spanish and I taught them English, my niece and nephew would knock on my window while I was doing homework in my room to say hello, and by the end of my time there I felt like a proud older sister when they’d run up to me in our neighborhood and tell me something they’d accomplished in school. This photo is of Zoila, my host niece, wearing her gitana dress for La Feria. Córdoba is a deeply traditional city and Feria in May is the pride and joy of this place. I was lucky enough to experience the full tradition of Feria from a local perspective with my family and am so grateful to have established such strong ties with every one of them. (Córdoba, Spain) Submitted by Erin Griffin '16

Mahay (To Know)
Mahay (To Know)

Mahay (To Know)

“Mahay, mahay!” my dance teacher would tell me after we finished each dance with our dancing troop. Each day during my weeklong homestay in the rural region of Faux Cap, the villagers of Analafaly would dance with me for four hours, teaching me traditional dances. Stomping the ground, moving in a circle, and singing traditional Antandroy songs, we seemed to get to know each other better even though we shared no mutual languages. They would have gladly danced until midnight had I not been exhausted! I captured this shot after one of the long dance sessions. (Analafaly, Faux Cap, Madagascar) Submitted by Casey Ballin '16

 

Landscapes & Streetscapes

A landscape or streetscape that reveals or symbolizes your vision of the place you visited and provides a sense of the place in which it was taken. What about this image makes it meaningful for you?

La Grande Roue à République
La Grande Roue à République

La Grande Roue à République

This photo was taken in December at la place de la République at the le Marché de Noël in Dijon, France. As République was transformed into a quintessential French Christmas Market, I grew excited to return home for the holidays. However, at the same time I knew that I would have to say goodbye to the city I called home for four months and all of the people who made the city so special to me. Some of my last and favorite memories of Dijon include riding this ferris wheel and strolling through the markets with the lifelong friends I made on this amazing trip. (Dijon, France) Submitted by Clare Stephens '18

Fue Permanente Emoción
Fue Permanente Emoción

Fue Permanente Emoción

When I mull over my time spent in Chile, I often think of this picture, taken in the Atacama Desert when six friends and I drifted across the alien landscape in a two-seater rental van. I don’t think any other image causes such an upwelling of feeling and memory from my abroad experience as this one. I found Chile to be a country marked by the powers of youth, exploration, and expression; all things that I also felt brimming within myself at that point in my life. The open road of the future captures the magical sentiment that Chile holds for me. (Atacama Desert, Chile) Submitted by Alex Rutan '16

The Streets of Venice
The Streets of Venice

The Streets of Venice

This photograph captures the effortless beauty and antiquity of Venice, a simple “streetscape” to contradict our perception of travel. While touring museums for my Renaissance Art History class, I was able to wander throughout the veins of the city, the Grand Canal that snakes through picturesque stone palazzos and piazzas. I captured this moment to emphasize the pure modesty of life in Venice, one that moves slowly and smoothly, much like the air-drying of laundry and the velvet ride of an Italian gondola. (Venice, Italy) Submitted by Kelly McCarthy '16

 

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Photo Contest 2014: winning photos from students abroad in 2013-14

Landscapes and Streetscapes

A landscape or streetscape that reveals the nature or architecture of the place you visited and illustrates a sense of place. Introduce the viewer to your destination beyond the tourist attractions.

Stoic Cow on Txindoki
Stoic Cow on Txindoki

Stoic Cow on Txindoki

A cow stoically observes as the photographer lounges on a Spanish mountainside. We may wonder, “How did this cow get here?” But the real question should be, “Is the cow wondering the same thing?” (Basque Country, Spain) Submitted by Ben Lester '15

Blurred Thames
Blurred Thames

Blurred Thames

For years I had London on the top of my photography bucket list. I had never lived in a city, so when I got the chance to study abroad at University College of London, I jumped at the opportunity to explore this metropolis with my camera. During one of my first weekends in London, I set out to take this shot—a unique perspective of the Thames River. Using long exposure, I hoped to capture the calm nature of the Thames as it winds through London—a bustling hub of international culture. (London, UK) Submitted by Jack Cohen '15

Los West Winds
Los West Winds

Los West Winds

The Chacabuco Valley in Patagonia is transitioning. In this photo it is progressing from winter to spring. In the bigger picture it is on the road to being a part of a new Chilean national park, Parque Nacional Patagonia. Our semester can be summed up by the question: What will be the effects of the future park on the valley's ecosystems and surrounding human communities? During the semester, we lived alongside wildlife in the valley. The guanacos and humans shared the camping grounds of Los West Winds. The mountains looked over us every day, reminding us how lucky we were to temporarily have a place in the valley, especially during this time of wonderful change. (Valle Chacabuco in the Aysén region of Chile) Submitted by Sydney Morison '15


Portraits

A portrait of a person or people you encountered abroad.

La Vie Tandroy (Life of the Antandroy)
La Vie Tandroy (Life of the Antandroy)

La Vie Tandroy (Life of the Antandroy)

This Antandroy mother and daughter live in Morafeno, a village in the Faux Cap region of Madagascar, one of the country's poorest, driest areas. From dawn till dusk they farm the dusty, infertile ground, growing beans, corn, and cactus fruit. In the background are symbols of their way of life: a tamarind tree and a crossbeam crucifix. The tamarind symbolizes how the mother and daughter are rooted to their sense of place and thrive despite having so little to survive on. The crossbeams on the center house form a crucifix and provide support to the house, symbolizing how the villagers’ Catholic faith supports and shelters them in such a difficult environment. (Morafeno Village, Tsiombe District, Androy Region, Madagascar ) Submitted by James Lucas '15

Four Housewives
Four Housewives

Four Housewives

These women, wearing their gold jewelry for a village wedding, live in Dhari village, India, in the foothills of the Himalayas. Taking a break from food preparation for the wedding festivities, the housewives agreed to be interviewed for my independent study project titled The Women of Uttarakhand: A Chullah Workforce. They discussed health consequences they experience on a daily basis from cooking with traditional stoves that burn wood and cow dung. (Dhari Village, Uttarakhand, India) Submitted by Divya Bisht '15

Kostas’ Karrots
Kostas’ Karrots

Kostas’ Karrots

The Laiki is a place to procure more than just produce. This market, in Athens, is where I bought my groceries every Friday for a semester. Produce ranged from olives to blood oranges to dates. It offered a chance to try out a little of my modern Greek and really learn more about the people of Greece. Several of these vendors had Ph.D.s (universities are free), and so they reminded me that education extends beyond a classroom. (Athens, Greece) Submitted by Catherine Maguire '15


People and Society

A photo that, for you, captures or illustrates the way of life or cultural context of the people among whom you lived during your studies abroad.

Good News
Good News

Good News

A Maasai mother holds her son during a health clinic led by School for Field Studies students near Kimana, Kenya. The children were tested for malnutrition and the adults were tested for HIV and AIDS. (Kimana, Kenya) Submitted by Sara Miller '15

Neighbors
Neighbors

Neighbors

The woman in this photo was the mother of our chef at the research station in Kimana, Kenya. Our ties at the station with the village women were the most important part of the semester to me. Maasai women are extremely hardworking, and it was a privilege to work and spend time with them. Her expression in this photo reflects that hard work and determination. Additionally, the bright colors of their daily outfits that they craft became a symbol of my time in this home away from home. (Kimana, Kenya) Submitted by Arianna Porter '15

The Family Bike
The Family Bike

The Family Bike

Throughout Europe, each particular country and its citizens carry a set of skills specific to their own region. In Amsterdam I looked on in disbelief as what I presumed to be impossible was nothing more than a quotidian fact of life. Surrounded by individuals who appeared to be carrying any number of objects, or even family members, on a single bike, I could only stop and ponder the implications of balance and safety. (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) Submitted by Kelvin Lui '15


Appearance vs. Reality

A photo can reveal several levels of experience. Describe what the viewer sees at first glance, then explain what the photo says about what you learned studying abroad or how you grew.

White Walls and Sunlight
White Walls and Sunlight

White Walls and Sunlight

Instead of stairs, the Round Tower (Rundetårn), in Denmark, has a sloped, easy-to-climb walkway that, before you realize it, leads to a gorgeous view of Copenhagen. The inside of the Rundetårn provides wonderful lighting and fun, clean architecture that mixes history with modern tourism. The gradual, upwards slope exemplifies the growth that one undergoes while studying abroad. While abroad, it was not immediately apparent how all of my experiences were impacting my personality and overall outlook on life. These changes only became apparent as I was reimmersed into my life in the United States. Just like the steady climb to the top of the tower followed by a miraculous view, study abroad was a continual series of new experiences that allowed me to have a better understanding of both who I am and the world around me. (Copenhagen, Denmark) Submitted by Julia Mitchell '15

Running for What?
Running for What?

Running for What?

I actually hate this photo. I took it from the back seat of my safari vehicle on the way down into Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania as a way to capture the visceral divide between tourists and locals. The Maasai people of Tanzania are sort of frozen in time by the tourist industry; they are pressured into reverting to their outdated traditions for the ‘mzungos’ in hopes of getting some donations or selling their goods. More often than not these struggling people end up as one more part of the "beautiful Africa" story told by tourists upon return to their probably comfortable homeland. (Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania) Submitted by Maddie Johnson '15

Under the Lights at Place de la République
Under the Lights at Place de la République

Under the Lights at Place de la République

This photo was taken in Dijon, France, from inside a fountain decorated with a tent of lights for the Christmas festival. I passed by this fountain every day on my way to class, and during the warmer months there were always lots of people standing around it taking pictures and admiring its beauty. The night that my friends and I went to the fountain and I took this picture, we were the only people there. That made me feel like we got the see another side of this landmark that not many other people had seen before. I think that night encompasses the experience I had studying abroad—the feeling that I was able to explore deeply a culture that most people only see one side of. (Dijon, France) Submitted by Cate Johnson '17